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Blood Flow Restriction in the Aspetar Sports Medicine Journal


Aspetar recently released Volume 9 of their Sports Medicine Journal. This volume is open access and covers everything from assessment through reconditioning after ACL reconstruction. Johnny Owens, Stephen Patterson, and Luke Hughes were featured to address the use of BFR in early stage rehab from ACLR and how that might impact return to play.

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High Intensity Leg Press Does not Increase Leg Extension Strength With or Without BFR after ACL


Generally, it is thought that the early phase use of BFR is the best target in rehab after ACLR. The data on this remains limited, but until recently no one had examined coupling higher load BFR in a later stage of this rehab process. In our featured paper here, a group from the University of Michigan investigated the application of heavy load BFR following ACLR. Their results lead them to title their paper, “Blood Flow Restriction Training Applied with High-Intensity Exercise does not Improve Quadriceps Muscle Function After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.” Beginning at 10 weeks post-op, and continuing at a visit frequency of twice weekly for 8 weeks, four groups performed high intensity leg press exercise as an addition to “standard-of-care rehabilitation”. The authors found no significant differences between any groups in quadriceps muscle strength, size, or activation.

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The PACER Project


The PACER Project

The Post Acute COVID-19 Exercise and Rehabilitation (PACER) Project is an initiative formed by multiple APTA sections & academies as a resource for administrators, and to increase practitioner proficiency in cardiovascular and pulmonary (CVP) physical therapy, including critical illness sequelae.

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